Nathan Klein
Significance

In my project I am exploring the objects that people would save from their homes should there be an emergency such as a fire.  What would they rush to save, and more importantly, Why?
My photos have captured these people with their objects; showing their emotion and presentation with little direction from me.
I believed initially that the objects chosen would give evidence of the owner’s animistic thinking, but this was largely missing. Indeed, the objects chosen by the people showed a more agnostic point of view in the owner.
A high level of sentiment was however shown in their manner of selection expressed through feeling rather than monetary worth or as a functional or useful object.
As always, judgements can be constructed by the viewer, but this was a task that allowed the thought process to take place without the rush of adrenaline, and a frenzied escape, which with little doubt would have resulted in a different, if any, object being saved. 
Have the objects shown an expression of the personality of those photographed?  Is there an insight to be reached from the age and class of those involved?  Are people’s choices influenced by postmodern or deconstructed ideological constructs relating to human society? The answer to all these questions is an undoubted ‘yes’.   This is the beginning of the project, there is much more to explore over many years; this will be a project that develops and matures whilst exploring age, race and class.  
There is no room for absolutism in such a scenario.  The same question on a different day may result in a different object.  Choosing a single object is a very difficult challenge, one that ignores relationism and the natural instinct to save everything.
Even in this narrow selection of people, the high level of anthropomorphic subjectivity and the wide range of objects are startling.
A simple question was given; the answers have proven to be complex to understand and analyse.  What would you save?
7 of December, 2013

Significance

In my project I am exploring the objects that people would save from their homes should there be an emergency such as a fire.  What would they rush to save, and more importantly, Why?

My photos have captured these people with their objects; showing their emotion and presentation with little direction from me.

I believed initially that the objects chosen would give evidence of the owner’s animistic thinking, but this was largely missing. Indeed, the objects chosen by the people showed a more agnostic point of view in the owner.

A high level of sentiment was however shown in their manner of selection expressed through feeling rather than monetary worth or as a functional or useful object.

As always, judgements can be constructed by the viewer, but this was a task that allowed the thought process to take place without the rush of adrenaline, and a frenzied escape, which with little doubt would have resulted in a different, if any, object being saved. 

Have the objects shown an expression of the personality of those photographed?  Is there an insight to be reached from the age and class of those involved?  Are people’s choices influenced by postmodern or deconstructed ideological constructs relating to human society? The answer to all these questions is an undoubted ‘yes’.   This is the beginning of the project, there is much more to explore over many years; this will be a project that develops and matures whilst exploring age, race and class.  

There is no room for absolutism in such a scenario.  The same question on a different day may result in a different object.  Choosing a single object is a very difficult challenge, one that ignores relationism and the natural instinct to save everything.

Even in this narrow selection of people, the high level of anthropomorphic subjectivity and the wide range of objects are startling.

A simple question was given; the answers have proven to be complex to understand and analyse.  What would you save?


Posted 8 months ago
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